Close
Help
Need Help?





JOURNAL

Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports

689,008 Journal Article Views | Journal Analytics

Delay in Diagnosis of Influenza Virus in an Elderly Hospitalized Patient: a Fatal Outcome

Submit a Paper



Publication Date: 08 Jan 2012

Type: Case report

Journal: Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports

Citation: Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports 2012:5 5-8

doi: 10.4137/CCRep.S8460

Abstract

Influenza is a well established cause of seasonal hospitalizations and deaths among older persons. However, influenza is frequently underdiagnosed by physicians, because its clinical presentations are often complex, particularly in elderly patients. We report the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted to the emergency department in January 2008 with fever, vomiting, and a history of asthenia and falls in the preceding three days. Diagnosis of influenza at admission was missed. Influenza was diagnosed by direct fluorescent antibody in a sputum specimen four days later, but the evolution was rapidly unfavorable with fatal respiratory distress syndrome. This case illustrates that, during the influenza season, influenza should be suspected in elderly patients admitted to hospital even if they do not present with classical symptoms. Immunofluorescence testing on sputum specimens can provide a rapid diagnosis and merits further evaluation.



Downloads

PDF  (434.05 KB PDF FORMAT)

RIS citation   (ENDNOTE, REFERENCE MANAGER, PROCITE, REFWORKS)

BibTex citation   (BIBDESK, LATEX)

XML






What Your Colleagues Say About Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports
The experience with the journal was excellent.  The submission process with simple, reviews were expedited quickly, and communication with the corresponding author was excellent.
Dr Andrew Briggs (Curtin University, Australia)
More Testimonials

Quick Links




Follow Us We make it easy to find new research papers.




SUBJECT HUBS
Author Survey Results
author_survey_results
All authors are surveyed after their articles are published. Authors are asked to rate their experience in a variety of areas, and their responses help us to monitor our performance. Presented here are their responses in some key areas. No 'poor' or 'very poor' responses were received; these are represented in the 'other' category.
See Our Results