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Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology

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Second Generation Drug-Eluting Stents: A Review of the Everolimus-Eluting Platform

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Publication Date: 23 Jul 2013

Type: Review

Journal: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology

Citation: Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology 2013:7 115-126

doi: 10.4137/CMC.S11516

Abstract

Everolimus-eluting stents (EES) represent the next generation of drug-eluting stents (DES). Important design modifications include thin strut stent backbones, less inflammatory and more biocompatible polymers, and lower drug dosing. The cobalt chromium EES fluoropolymer XIENCE V stent has been the most extensively studied of such stents. In animal models, this stent demonstrated minimal vessel inflammation, a biologically active endothelium with strut coverage similar to a bare metal stent, and inhibition of intimal hyperplasia comparable to that seen with sirolimus-eluting stents. The SPIRIT family of clinical trials demonstrated low rates of late loss, and clinical restenosis, as well as low rates of very late stent thrombosis. These excellent clinical outcomes addressed limitations of the 1st generation DES, and substantiated widespread clinical use of the EES platform.


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